The Political + Economic Power of Latino Immigrants in California

More than one quarter of Californians are immigrants.

If you didn't think Immigrants contribute positively to our Economy, think again.

Here's proof that our hard-working brothers + sisters deserve recognition for their contributions to California.

Check out the statistics!

 

More than half of Californians are Latino or Asian—and they vote.

  • The Latino share of California’s population grew from 25.8% in 1990, to 32.4% in 2000, to 37.7% (or 14.1 million people) in 2010The Asian share of the population grew from 9.2% in 1990, to 10.9% in 2000, to 13.1% (or 4.9 million people) in 2010, according to the U.S. Census Bureau.
  • Latinos comprised 21.4% (or 3 million) of California voters in the 2008 elections, and Asians 9.7% (or 1.3 million), according to the U.S. Census Bureau.  The number of Latino and Asian voters is one million more than the margin of victory (3.3 million votes) by which Barack Obama defeated John McCain.
  • In California, 90.4% of children with immigrant parents were U.S. citizens in 2009, according to data from the Urban Institute.
  • In 2009, 90.6% of children in Asian families in California were U.S. citizens, as were 93.3% of children in Latino families.

Immigrant workers, entrepreneurs, and taxpayers are integral to California’s economy.

  • Immigrants comprised 34.6% of the state’s workforce in 2010 (or 6.5 million workers), according to the U.S. Census Bureau.
  • “Immigrants comprise more than one third of the California labor force. They figure prominently in key economic sectors such as agriculture, manufacturing and services. Immigrants provide leadership and labor for the expansion of California’s growing economic sectors—from telecommunications and information technology to health services and housing construction,” according to the California Immigrant Policy Center.
  • Immigrants in California pay roughly $30 billion in federal taxes, $5.2 billion in state income taxes, and $4.6 billion in sales taxes each year. In California, “the average immigrant-headed household contributes a net $2,679 annually to Social Security, which is $539 more than the average US-born household.”
  • Immigrants accounted for 34% of total economic output in the Los Angeles metropolitan area, 29% in the San Francisco metropolitan area, 25% in the Riverside metropolitan area, and 23% in the San Diego metropolitan area in 2007, according to a study by the Fiscal Policy Institute.
  • Unauthorized immigrants comprised 9.7% of the California’s workforce in 2010 (or 1.9 million workers), according to a report by the Pew Hispanic Center.
  • If all unauthorized immigrants were removed from California, the state would lose $301.6 billion in economic activity, decrease total employment by 17.4%, and eliminate 3.6 million jobs, according to a study by Dr. Raul Hinojosa-Ojeda and Marshall Fitz. If unauthorized immigrants in California were legalized, it would add 633,000 jobs to the economy, increase labor income by $26.9 billion, and increase tax revenues by $5.3 billion.

Immigrant, Latino, and Asian entrepreneurs and consumers add hundreds of billions of dollars and a more than a million jobs to California’s economy.

  • The 2010 purchasing power of California’s Latinos totaled $265.2 billion—an increase of 287% since 1990. Asian buying power totaled $171.7 billion—an increase of 297.6% since 1990, according to the Selig Center for Economic Growth at the University of Georgia.
  • California’s 566,573 Latino-owned businesses had sales and receipts of $80.3 billion and employed 458,922 people in 2007, the last year for which data is available. The state’s 508,969 Asian-owned businesses had sales and receipts of $181.3 billion and employed

905,957 people.  Together, businesses owned by Latinos and Asians comprised more than one-quarter of all businesses in the state, according to the U.S. Census Bureau’s 2007 Survey of Business Owners.

Most native born Californians have experienced wage gains from immigration.

  • “During 1990–2004, immigration induced a 4 percent real wage increase for the average native worker,” according to a 2007 study by economist Giovanni Peri of the University of California, Davis.
  • The reason for wage increases is that “immigrant workers often serve as complements to native workers rather than as their direct competitors for jobs, thereby increasing total economic output. Native workers benefit because they are able to specialize in more productive work.”

California’s immigrants move up the socioeconomic ladder over time—learning English, buying homes, and escaping poverty.

  • A study by demographer Dowell Myers of the University of Southern California found that:
  • The share of California’s foreign-born Latinos who reported being proficient in English as of 2000 rose from 33.4% of those who had been in the United States for less than 10 years to 73.5% among those who had been here for 30 years or longer.
  • The share of foreign-born Latinos in California who owned their own homes as of 2005 rose from 16.4% of those who had been in the United States for less than 10 years to 64.6% among those who had lived here for 30 years or more.
  • The share of California’s foreign-born Latinos who lived below the poverty line as of 2005 dropped from 28.7% of those who had been in the United States for less than 10 years to 11.8% among those who had been here for 30 years or more.
  • The share of immigrants in Los Angeles County who owned their own homes as of 2005-2006 rose from 14.8% of those who had come to the United States within the previous 10 years to 63.4% of those who had lived here for more than 30 years—compared to a homeownership rate of 54.2% among the native-born, according to a study by Manuel Pastor and Rhonda Ortiz at the University of Southern California.

Unauthorized immigrants pay taxes.

  • Unauthorized immigrants in California paid $2.7 billion in state and local taxes in 2010, according to data from the Institute for Taxation and Economic Policy, which includes:
  • $176.9 million in state income taxes.
  • $735.8 million in property taxes.
  • $1.8 billion in sales taxes.

Immigrants are integral to California’s economy as students.

Naturalized citizens excel educationally.

  • In California, 32.1% of foreign-born persons who were naturalized U.S. citizens in 2009 had a bachelor’s or higher degree, compared to 17.5% of noncitizens. At the same time, only 25% of naturalized citizens lacked a high-school diploma, compared to 49.2% of noncitizens.
  • The number of immigrants in California with a college degree increased by 42.8% between 2000 and 2009, according to data from the Migration Policy Institute.
  • In California, 81% of children with immigrant parents were considered “English proficient” as of 2009, according to data from the Urban Institute.

The English proficiency rate among Asian children in California was 86.4%, while for Latino children it was 83%, as of 2009.